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Asia Noise News Building Accoustics Building Acoustics Environment Home Noise and Vibration Product News Uncategorized Vibration

Acoustic Treatment in Schools

Several generations of students and teachers have battled the inherent problems caused by noise and poor acoustic design in educational settings. Despite the problem having been recognized for over 100 years, acoustics in classrooms remain under-addressed in older buildings and many newer built schools. A 2012 released study “Essex Study-Optimal classroom acoustics for all” defines the need and benefits of acoustically treating classrooms. The study looked at the impact of reducing reverberation time in a working classroom environment. The conclusion drawn after several measurements of acoustics and surveys with participants was a demonstrable clear benefit to all by improving the acoustic environment. Simply, uncontrolled reverberations in a classroom have a direct negative effect on health and performance, for both students and teachers.

Reverberation is the echo of sound reflecting from hard surface to hard surface causing noise to build up and creating a confusing, unintelligible mass of sound. The hard surfaces such as windows, blackboards, concrete blocks and gypsum walls found in most classrooms do not absorb sound energy and as a result, the sound reflects back into the room, arriving at the ear many times at intervals that are milliseconds apart. This creates a sound that is smeared and the brain has difficulty distinguishing the primary information and disseminating it from the reverberation. This problem is exacerbated when hearing assist devices and cochlear implants are used. Excess reverberation also affects students with auditory processing issues, ADHD, and other learning challenges. In fact, all students benefit from lowering the reverberation and improving intelligibility.

Reverberation is measured in relation to time. The measurement (RT60) is the time it takes for sound to decay by 60dB in a particular space. The greater the reverberation time, the more “echo” in a room, and the greater the listening challenges become. The reverberation time of a room will depend on variables such as the size of the classroom, the reflective surfaces, and how other absorbent or reflective features in the room may increase the effect.


The Effect on Students and Teachers
Most learning occurs from the verbal communication of information and ideas. Traditionally, classrooms have not been designed with attention to how the room sounds or how it may affect the students and teachers that are using it. It is well known that proximity to the teacher increases student engagement and the comprehension of the material being taught. As most classes have 30 or more students in it, it is impossible for every student to be close to the teacher. For students at the rear of the class, the volume level reaching the students will be reduced by as much as 20dB compared to when it is created. The brain then has to differentiate whether the sound being received is the source material or the sound bouncing off the walls. When one factors in the natural reverberation in the room, the delay in sound reaching the ear, along with distractions such as HVAC noise, the classroom base-level sound and noise seeping in from outside the doors and windows, it is not surprising to find that many children are simply not hearing the material they are being taught.
And this is only the beginning. As the ambient sound level in the classroom increases, the teacher naturally increases his or her voice level. The ‘classroom chatter’ naturally increases to compensate and the problem exacerbates to the point where the teacher and students begin to lose concentration.

Children do not Listen Like Adults
When you consider the acoustic problems described, studies suggest that as many as 30% of students may actually be challenged in understanding their teacher’s message. Poor intelligibility due to proximity to the teacher, excessive reverberation and noise result in a lack of comprehension of the material being taught.
Most adults would not notice these challenges as life experience allows us to “fill in the missing words”.

The solution is to acoustically treat the classroom
Right from the early days of radio, broadcasters came to the conclusion that unless the source broadcast was clear and concise, the message would get lost. To address the problem, absorptive acoustic panels were mounted on the broadcast studio wall surfaces to suppress the reflections and improve intelligibility for the listener. This practice continues to this day and the same rules apply whether you are teaching in a classroom, delivering a message in a house of worship or broadcasting a distance learning class over the internet.

A popular solution is to suspend the panels from the ceiling. The added benefit of the airspace created behind the panel when suspended increases the panel’s absorptive surface area. This is particularly effective in noisy cafeterias. For classrooms with T-bar ceilings, there are acoustic tiles that can replace the original non-absorptive compressed fiber tile. Actual panel placement is not as critical as one may think. It is more about using available space to your best advantage by evenly distributing the panels around the room.
A classroom free from excessive reverberation and noise is far more conducive to learning and greatly contributes to better student success – whether the student has learning issues or not. Reducing the ambient sound level also makes it easier to teach, reduces teacher stress and burnout, and significantly reduces listening fatigue for everyone. When you consider the teacher – student benefits and the relatively low cost involved installing acoustic treatment, a practical solution for school districts and post secondary institutions that care about attaining the maximum results from their student body is readily available.

Credit : James Wright, Business development executive at Primacoustic

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Asia Noise News

Malaysian police conduct noise checks on their own

Malaysian police conduct noise checks on their own

Perhaps in an effort to show the Malaysian public that the law is being applied equally, police conducted motorcycle noise and modification checks on police personnel. The operation was held by the Traffic Investigation and Enforcement Department (JSPT) on police personnel exiting police headquarters at Bukit Aman, Kuala Lumpur.

This was held in response to public sentiment on social media saying the recent over the top police action against motorcycles was only targeted at the riding public. The vehicle examination special op involved 15 officers and 35 other JSPT personnel, accompanied by 5 officers from the police Integrity and Standard department (JIPS), along with personnel from the Department of Environment (DOE).

During the operation, 280 vehicles were inspected, resulting in 146 summons issued for offences such as “fancy” number plates, no side mirrors, no road tax and exhaust modifications. The main objective of this surprise check is to ensure police personnel complied with the law and road rules, showing an example to the public, as stated on the JSPT Facebook page.

Malaysia traffic noise checks

What do you think dear reader, are the police doing the job we pay them to do or is this just mere window dressing and playing to the public gallery? The recent persecution of road users, notable motorcyclists, has reportedly become overbearing and many feel the police are targeting the lower-income and disadvantaged group in these times of pandemic and lockdown with the resulting economic downturn across Malaysia.

While overbearingly noisy exhausts are a nuisance, the current disproportionate response starts to bring to mind images of a police state. 

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Asia Noise News Building Accoustics Building Acoustics Environment Home Industrial Noise and Vibration Product News Noise-th Uncategorized Vibration Virtual Data Room

Helmholtz Resonator

Resonate absorbers are the most powerful of low-frequency absorption technologies. Pound for pound and square foot per square foot, resonant absorbers can not be matched for low-frequency absorption. They are sometimes called resonance absorbers. We are speaking about real low-frequency absorption which represents all frequencies below 100 Hz. Resonant absorbers are different than other absorbers. They work best in areas of high room sound pressure not high sound velocity areas like porous absorbers that handle middle and high frequencies.

Vibrations & Sound Pressure
A resonant absorber is a vibrational system that “runs” on sound pressure. As vibrational science will tell us a resonant absorber is a mass vibrating against a spring. The mass is the cabinet and front wall or diaphragm. The spring is the air inside the cavity of the resonant absorber. If you change the vibrating mass and stiffness of the spring, you can control and tune the resonant absorber to the resonant frequency of choice. The internal mass or cabinet depth determines design frequency. The spring or internal air and cavity are used for achieving the rate of absorption above the unit’s designed for resonant frequency. There are three types of resonant absorbers: Helmholtz and Diaphragmatic and Membrane.

Helmholtz / Membrane
A Helm resonator is a box or tube with an opening or slot at its mouth. Air enters the slot which has a calculated width, length, and depth. The slot is attached to a cabinet or cylinder of different widths and depths. A glass coke bottle is a good example of a Helmholtz resonator. It is a resonant absorber or as some would term a resonance absorber. The frequency or resonance is determined by the slot dimensions along with the cabinet or cylinder depth. Helms are frequency specific and narrow frequency band coverage. A membrane absorber works similar to a diaphragmatic. It has a membrane than vibrates in sympathy to sound pressure. This vibrating membrane is attached to a cabinet which has a certain depth and fills material. A diaphragmatic absorber works similar to a membrane with more performance per square foot.

 

Calculate Resonant frequency of Helmholtz Slot Absorber

Resonant Frequency Formula
fo = 2160*sqrt(r/((d*1.2*D)*(r+w)))
fo = resonant frequency
r = slot width
d = slat thickness
1.2 = mouth correction
D = cavity depth
w = slat width
2160 = c/(2*PI) but rounded
c = speed of sound in inch/sec
If the gaps vary say 5mm, 10mm, 15mm, 20mm and the wall is angled as shown below, a broad band low mid resonator is created that still keeps the high frequencies alive.

Remember the cavity behind must be airtight!
By working out the different slat widths and slat gaps you can create a broadband low mid resonator at specific frequencies.

Credit : mh-Audio.nl , acousticfields

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Asia Noise News

Brunei, Sabah: Mystery blast heard, early signs point to sonic boom or meteorite

Mysterious explosion heard in Sipitang, Labuan, Lawas (Sarawak) might originate from a sonic boom high in the skies...

KOTA KINABALU: The mysterious explosion heard by many in Sipitang, Labuan, Lawas (Sarawak), and parts close to these areas on Sunday (Jan 31) could have been a sonic boom or a meteorite which exploded in mid-air.

The Astronomical Society of Brunei Darussalam (PABD) said it received numerous reports from Bruneians who also heard the mysterious loud noise.

The PABD then issued a notice seeking eyewitness accounts of the phenomenon, which is believed to have occurred at about 11 am.

Some Bruneians later shared their experiences and uploaded blurry pictures of what appears to be a fireball trailing smoke to PABD’s Facebook page.

A Sabahan in Brunei, Joey Yong, said she heard something like extremely loud thunder but did not know what it was.

The accounts from these witnesses may be found here.

Earlier, authorities in Sabah, including the navy, police and fire brigade, said they did not receive reports of any incidents that could have caused the blast.

Sabah Meteorological Department director Amir Zudi Hashim said the department did not record any seismic activity that could have caused the sound.

Sonic boom cause of explosion like noise Sabah

 

People in Sabah who claimed to have heard the blast said they felt the earth shake when the explosion was heard.

Source

 
 
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Asia Noise News

Malaysian man apologises for making 11 speed bumps near his home

Malaysian man apologises for making 11 speed bumps near his home

BESUT (THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) – A man who illegally installed 11 asphalt speed bumps on the street next to his house in Kampung Padang Luas, Jertih, has apologised for his action.

Mr Nor Muhamad Roslam Harun, 40, admitted his mistake in building so many speed bumps on a 40m stretch and causing a hassle to other residents.

“Police officers came to see me on Wednesday morning and asked me to remove all the speed bumps that I had installed.

“So I hired a bulldozer operator to remove all the speed bumps on the street, including the two original ones,” he told Bernama.

The case went viral on social media a few days ago after a man uploaded a picture of the “new speed bumps” on the street leading to his house, which he claimed had been installed by his neighbour.

Mr Nor Muhamad said he installed the speed bumps because he was often disturbed by the noise of passing vehicles.

“The noise from cars and motorcycles disrupts my sleep. I’m so stressed out and I also have other health issues.

“Actually, I wanted to make speed ‘humps’, but the asphalt hardened so quickly before they could be flattened, causing them to become bumps.

“This made the road inaccessible to all cars except four-wheel drives,” he said.

Mr Nor Muhamad revealed that he spent RM1,080 (S$355) of his Employees Provident Fund i-Sinar money to install the speed bumps.

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Asia Noise News Environment Home Industrial

Scientists have pioneered a new technique to produce arrays of sound produced entirely by heat

The team of researchers from the Centre for Metamaterial Research and Innovation at the University of Exeter used devices, known as thermophones, to create a fully controlled array from just a thin metal film attached to some metal wires.

The results, published in Science Advances, could pave the way for a new generation of sound technology, including home cinema systems.

Traditionally, arrays have been used in a host of every day applications, including ultrasound and sound systems. Arrays allow sounds from several sources to be ‘steered’ in a certain direction, to gain greater control and clarity of the sound produced.

Conventional speaker arrays rely on the production of sound through driven movement of some object — such as a speaker cone. The new study, however, pioneers arrays of speakers that produce sound entirely by heat: thermophones.

Although thermophones have been in existence for more than 100 years, they have, until now, had limited real-world application. However, they have a host of advantages from their mechanical counterparts — including no moving parts and the ability to be mass produced from inexpensive, sustainable materials.

Crucially, they can even be made transparent and flexible, which is desirable for the new wave of flexible technologies being produced.

For the study, the researchers found that, when combined into an array, thermophones are able to reproduce the same control over sound fields as traditional arrays.

However, they do much more than this: as they are driven by electrical currents, the sound they produce mirrors the subtle movement of the current carriers as they flow through the device and, as a result, they create a much richer sound field than traditional arrays.

The researchers suggest that the study opens a route to radically simplify array design, showing that with thermophone technology, it is possible to create a fully controlled array from nothing more than a thin metal film attached to some metal wires.

David Tatnell, lead author of the study and a PhD researchers at the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Metamaterials said: “Using heat to produce sound is a game changer as it allows us to make speaker arrays smaller than ever before. This, as well as the ability to make the speakers flexible and transparent, has a lot of exciting potential applications, such as haptic feedback systems in smartphones and other wearables.

Credit: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200702113652.htm

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Asia Noise News Building Accoustics Environment Industrial

Acoustic Design According to Room Shape

The shape of the room defines the movement of the sound waves within the room. Placement of acoustic materials should be determined by the way the sound moves in that particular room in order to ensure optimal efficiency of the materials.

1. NARROW ROOMS 

Placing the sound absorbing materials on the ceiling in a narrow room will not create the wanted acoustic effect. 

Sound absorbers must be placed as close to the sound source as possible. Therefore, the absorbing materials must primarily be placed on the walls

2.ROUND ROOMS 

The sound moves towards the constructive centre thereby creating echoes.

The sound diffusing elements should be placed on the curved surfaces in order for the sound to be dispersed in many directions.

3.1 LARGE ROOMS WITH LOW CEILING

In large rooms the sound spreading is experienced as the greatest challenge, since the speech sounds can be heard over long distances.

Sound absorbing and sound diffusing materials should be used, and sound barriers should be applied to the ceiling. The sound regulation from the floor is secured by furniture and the use of sound barriers.

3.2. LARGE ROOMS WITH HIGH CEILING

The acoustic environment in large rooms is sometimes experienced as the one at a railway station. This is partially connected to the fact that it is difficult to concentrate due to the relatively high noise level. Another reason for this is the fact that the conversation over short distances is impeded due to the sound being masked or drowned by the surrounding noise 

It is therefore important that all the available surfaces are equipped with effective sound absorbers and sound diffusers. The furniture along with the sound barriers play a highly active role by diffusing the sound and thereby making the existing sound absorbers and diffusers even more efficient.

4. SMALL ROOM WITH PARALLEL WALLS 

In small rooms, the low frequencies often seem to be predominant. Therefore, the speech appears to consist primarily of humming sounds. Sound absorbers with a low-frequency profile should be used and placed on the ceiling surface.

5. CEILING DOMES

The sound diffusing elements should be placed on the curved surfaces in order for the sound to be dispersed in many directions.

6. INCLINED CEILING

Inclined ceilings have both a sound spreading and a sound concentrating effect. In most cases, the sound is concentrated because the sound regulation of the area around the inclined ceiling has not been considered carefully.

The wall area opposite the inclined ceiling should also be equipped with sound absorbing materials. As a principal rule, all surfaces above the normal ceiling height (2.60 m) including the end walls should be equipped with sound absorbers.

7.INCLINED WALLS

Inclined walls have both a sound spreading and sound concentrating effect. 

The sound spreading effect is achieved by inclining the wall in proportion to other walls and the ceiling. In general, the walls inclined by more than 6 degrees ensure an excellent sound diffusion. The most effective diffusion is obtained by applying several angles.

8. VAULTED CEILING

In rooms with vaulted ceilings, the sound is concentrated in the constructive centre making the sound appear with a stronger intensity. The sound movements also appear stronger along the curve.

9. CONNECTED ROOMS

Rooms that are linked by a large opening in between, influence each others sound environment. A room without acoustic regulation can act as an echo chamber reinforcing the sound, when connected to an acoustically regulated room.

Both rooms must be equipped with sound absorbers. If the distance between the opening and the opposite walls is short (5-6 m), the walls much be covered with sound absorbers or diffusers.

10. ROOMS WITH MEZZANINE

In rooms with mezzanine, it is possible to create different sound environments in the same room. In the large, open room, an environment with long reverberation time is created. The space above and below the mezzanine has a shorter reverberation time. The challenge posed in this type of rooms is the sound reflection and the harmonization of the different reverberation times.

The wall opposite the mezzanine should be equipped with sound absorbers or diffusers. In addition, sound absorbers should be placed on the underside and the banister of the mezzanine. In order to prevent large differences in the reverberation times between the large room and the space around the mezzanine, sound barriers can be applied.

Credit: KNAUF DANOLINE

Check out our free reverberation online calculator (for basic rooms).

https://www.geonoise.com/reverberation-time-calculator/

Categories
Asia Noise News Environment

Noise in Malaysia

What Covid-19 did to Malaysia

2020 has been a year full of ups and downs. One big thing that affected, in fact, is still affecting the whole world is undeniably the Covid-19 pandemic. No doubt that the pandemic has caused a lot of downhills in the development of many aspects, like economy and social, but there is one thing that have shown obvious positive sign during this situation: the environmental change.

Figure 1 A picture showing the clearer skies in Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia (Photos: Filepic).

According to a Malaysian news report by Ming Teoh from The Star, the movement control order (MCO) that was carried out to tackle the Covid-19 spread in Malaysia has brought positive environmental impacts to the country (Teoh, 2020). People were amazed by the clean rivers, clear blue skies and the recovery of nature and wildlife. Of course, due to the MCO where a lot of human activities were restricted, the streets and urban roads have been very quiet as compared to the usual noise level. The improved noise quality resulted in lower noise pollution, which made the sounds of the fauna more apparent. But once everyone gets back to normal life when the MCO is lifted, how long can this positive environmental situation last? Will there be enough time for the environment to heal properly?

The Department of Environment (DOE), Ministry of Energy, Science, Technology, Environment and Climate Change (MESTECC), Malaysia

The Department of Environment (DOE) from the Ministry of Energy, Science, Technology, Environment and Climate Change (MESTECC) of Malaysia have been very concerned about this issue all the while, specifically on the noise quality of the country. They have constantly been updating the guidelines to handle noise or vibration for various applications, for example vehicle-noise, ambient noise, or outdoor noise sources in the environment. In one of the published guidelines for environmental noise limits and control (2009), the DOE have specified a table showing the permissible sound levels for different applications, shown in Table 1 as one of the examples from the guidelines (Air & Noise, 2019). 

Table 1 An example of the permissible sound levels listed in the guidelines published by the DOE.

The permissible sound levels differ by the applications (i.e. use of land, human density) and the different times of the day, to ensure that the circumstances of various conditions are taken into account during the sound level measurements. For instance, the ambient noise limits are set such that it is an absolute limit based on the average level of noise (which should not be exceeded in a specified period), or in accordance with a relative limit based on the permitted increase in noise level with respect to the background level. It is mentioned that the limits should always be consistent with the environmental noise climate of the location. The rest of the noise limit schedules listed in the guidelines include those for land use, road traffic, railway/transit trains, construction, and maintenance, which are the main sources of outdoor noise in the country. 

Besides that, the report also covers guidelines on planning process, noise impact assessments, quantifying of noise disturbance, and guidance in environmental noise mitigation through planning and control. These are ideally applied in new and existing projects planning, in which the projects can cover anything that involves noise, as a potential concern or needed to be measured and assessed. This is a very imperative measure from the DOE to enforce noise control in the country to work on controlling the noise impact of the relevant applications, thus overcoming the noise pollution in Malaysia. With these actions being taken and followed, the goal to maintaining a better noise quality in the country can be achieved in near future.

Written by:

Khei Yinn Seow

Mechanical Engineer

Geonoise Malaysia

khei@geonoise.asia 

References:

Air & Noise, P. S. C. S., 2019. Guidelines for Environmental Noise Limits and Control (Third Edition), Putrajaya: Department of Environment Malaysia.

Teoh, M., 2020. Blue skies, less waste: Covid-19 and the MCO’s effects on the environment., s.l.: The Star.

Categories
Asia Noise News Building Acoustics Environment Industrial Vibration

Building Vibration Limits in Indonesia

A lot of activities and businesses have the potential to have negative effects to their environment because of the vibration that they produce. For example, construction (for example during piling), mining and and other vibration-generating activities. This vibration can disturb the comfort and health of people around it, and even can have destructive effects to nearby buildings.

In Indonesia, the vibration limit is regulated through Ministerial Decree of Ministry of Environment No. 49 Year 1996. This regulation was made to ensure healthy environment for human and other living creatures to live in. Consequently, the vibration generated from human activities need to be regulated.

In this regulation, businesses and activities are required to:

  1. Comply to the vibration limit in the decree. This is required for businesses and activities to obtain certain relevant permits to be able to operate.
  2. Use vibration reduction equipment
  3. Report vibration monitoring activities at least once in 3 (three) months to the Governor, Minister, Government agencies that are responsible to control environmental impact, other technical institutions that is responsible for the activities and other organizations that might need the vibration monitoring report.

The vibration limit is separated into few parts which are:

  1. Vibration limits for health and comfort
  2. Mechanical vibration limits based on its destructive effects
  3. Mechanical vibration limits based on building types
  4. Shock limits

The following table and graphs is the vibration limit for health and comfort:

Conversion:

Acceleration = (2πf)2 x displacement

Velocity = 2πf x displacement

The graphic representation of the table above is as follows:

The table below is the vibration limits based on the destructive effects:

As seen above, the peak velocity limit from the vibration is separated into 4 categories which are:

  • Category A: non-destructive
  • Category B: Possibly destructive for plastering (crack, or in certain cases the plaster can fell off the wall) 
  • Category C: Possibly destructive for structural components that bear loads
  • Category D: High risk of destruction of load bearing walls

The following graph is the vibration limit based on destructive effects in a graphical form:

Mechanical vibration limit can also be categorized into the types of buildings. The buildings are categorized into 3 which are:

  1. Buildings for commercial, industrial, and other similar use.
  2. Residential and other buildings with similar design and usage
  3. Structures that are sensitive to vibration and cannot be categorized into category 1 and 2, for example preserved buildings with high cultural value

Below is the vibration limits for the building category above:

The table below is shock limit for buildings:

CategoryBuilding TypeMaximum velocity (mm/s)
1Old buildings with high historical value2
2Buildings with existing defects, cracks can be seen on the walls5
3Buildings with good condition, minor cracks on plaster is acceptable10
4Buildings with high structural strength (for example industrial building which is made from concrete and steel)10 – 40

The ministerial decree also describe the measurement and analysis method for vibration as follows:

  1. Instruments:
    1. Vibration transducer (Accelerometer or seismometer)
    2. Vibration measurement device or analysis device (Vibration meter or vibration analyzer)
    3. 1/3 octave or narrow band filter
    4. Signal recorder
    5. FFT Analyzer
  2. Measurement procedure:
    1. Vibration measurement related with health and comfort:
      • Place transducer on the floor or other vibrating surface, and connect it to the measuring device with filtration
      • Set the measuring instruments to measure displacement. If the measuring instruments do not have that on display, the conversion from acceleration or velocity can be used
      • Reading and recording is conducted for frequency between 4-63 Hz or with signal recording device
      • Measurement results with at least 13 data shall be plotted on graph
    2. Vibration measurement for structural health:
      • The measurement method is similar with the vibration measurement above, however the physical measure that is assessed is the peak velocity.
    3. Evaluation
      • The 13 data which are plotted on graph shall be compared with the vibration limits. The vibration is considered above the limit if the vibration level exceeds the limit at any frequency.

Definition

The definition used in the regulation of ministry of environment No 49 Year 1996 is as follows:

  1. Building structure is a part of building that is planned, calculated, and functioned to:
    • Support any kind of load (static load, dynamic load, and temporary load)
    • Functioned for building’s stability as a whole. For example: frame and bearing wall
  2. Structure’s component is a part of a building structure that contributes to structure’s function. For example: beams, columns, and slab.
  3. Bearing wall is a building structure which is a vertical plane that is functioned to support loads on top of it such as slab or roof.
  4. Non-structure components are parts of building that is not planned or functioned to support load. For example partition walls, door and window frames, etc.

Destructive impact on structure and non-structure:

  1. Destructive impact on structure: Destructive impacts that can endanger building stability (for example destruction of columns that potentially make a building collapses)
  2. Destructive impact on non-structure: Not dangerous to building stability, but can be a danger for building occupants (for example: when a partition wall collapses, it will not make the building collapse, but can injure occupants)

Degree of building destruction:

  1. Light: not dangerous for building stability and can be fixed without reducing building’s strength
  2. Moderate: Destruction that can reduce structural strength. To fix this, added reinforcement must be used.
  3. Severe: Degree of destruction that can endanger the building and potentially makes the building collapses.

Written by:

Hizkia Natanael
Acoustic Engineer
Phone: +6221 5010 5025
Email: hizkia@geonoise.asia

Categories
Asia Noise News Environment Home Industrial

Impact of Soundscape in Perception

Previously, we have discussed how the human auditory system works and recognizes the sound direction. Now, we will discuss how sound is perceived through our mind. In acoustics, the sound processing into the human auditory system is divided into 2 different mechanisms, namely hearing and listening. Hearing is the process of the mechanism of sound wave propagation into the human auditory system due to the sensitivity of the human auditory system to the vibration of sound waves with a certain frequency and intensity. While listening is a process of hearing along with the interpretation of information about the environment of a place based on the details contained in the vibration of sound waves that are heard.

Interpretation of sound information in the listening process is the vibrations of sound waves that are heard by humans. That not only represents the source of the sound but also contains information about the environment in which the sound is heard due to the physical mechanism that occurs when the sound wave propagates. Listening is considered a complex mechanism because it involves multi-level attention and higher cognitive functions. There are three levels in listening that are used to explain the complexity of listening namely listening-in-search, listening-in-readiness, and background listening.

Listening then forms us in an interpretation and perception in an environment based on its acoustic conditions. For example, if we close our eyes and we are given a stimulus in the form of the sound of water, squeaking, and the sound of wind with a certain level of sound pressure (SPL) we can interpret this as a feeling of being in a park. Then if the sound is added to the vehicle’s sound stimulus with a sufficiently audible sound pressure level, this might disturb the atmosphere of the park, and we feel uncomfortable. The action and interaction of natural factors and / or human factors acoustically in a place is called soundscape. This is because the sound in the environment does not only focus on a person, but also how one interacts with the sound and how one’s attention to the sound that arises.

Simple soundscape involves the type of sound source, location related to activities that occur in the related environment, environmental conditions and various subjective things that shape one’s perception and interpretation. This relates to the definition of soundscape in building one’s perception where it is also influenced by their socio-cultural and also the soundscape approach is seen from various disciplines.The soundscape process can be seen in the process diagram in Figure 1.

The analysis of soundscape can produce information for the basis for taking action in the form of sound management, which is to sort out what sounds should be heard and what sounds should be covered with other sounds (masking noise), by directing the attention of visitors to certain sounds that are in line with expectations they are based on the function of the related place.

Written by:

Adetia Alfadenata

Acoustic Engineer

Geonoise Indonesia

support.id@geonoise.asia

References :                                                                     

1. B. Truax, Acoustic Communication. Ablex Publishi, 1984

2. A. Ozcevik and Z. Y. Can, “A Field Study on The Subjective Evaluation of Soundscape,” in Acoustics 2012, 2012, no. April, pp. 2121–2126.

3. F. Aletta and J. Kang, “Soundscape descriptors and a conceptual framework for developing predictive soundscape models,” no. October 2017, 2016.

The British Standards Institution, “BS ISO 12913-1:2014 – Acoustics — Soundscape Part 1 : Definition and conceptual framework,” ISO, 2014.

5. D. Botteldooren, C. Lavandier, and A. Preis, “Understanding urban and natural soundscapes,” in Forum Acusticum 2011, 2011, vol. 1, no. c, pp. 2047–2052.